Archive for the 'Friday Breakfast Meetings' Category

No Meeting Dec. 2 - see topic notes below

Friday, Dec. 2, 2011 (cancelled - see below) at 7:30 - 9:30 a.m. Rebecca’s Cafe at Reservoir Place, Trapelo Road, Waltham.

TOPIC: We are currently evaluating comments from members and trying to assess the options for topics, topic leaders, and a possible time change. This is as a result of responses from our questionnaire sent on Tuesday, October 25.

If you did not see the message please respond to info@kmforum.org with comments for these questions:

1.    What is a compelling knowledge management related topic that would inspire you to come to a breakfast roundtable discussion?

2.    Would you like to choose a “1st Friday” of some month in the future to lead the discussion? Tell us when.

We have decided to table discussions for the present and come back later to you with a new agenda, new leaders, and perhaps a new schedule. In the meantime, please share your inspirations and thoughts on whether breakfast meetings should continue.

Staying Secure While Sharing & Acquiring Knowledge While Reflecting on Job’s Persona

Friday, October 7, 2011 at 7:30 - 9:30 a.m. Rebecca’s Cafe at Reservoir Place, Trapelo Road, Waltham.

TOPIC: Whether you are supplying comments on blog postings, signing up for content downloads, or sharing your thoughts or whereabouts via social media, you have exposed some personal information. What are the consequences and benefits? What are the tradeoffs for operating in an open media environment versus maintaining an anonymous or arms’ length relationship with your contacts and correspondents. What are the operational and technological options for sharing while ensuring a high level of personal security? This is a big topic that we we revisit in a future longer program but this discussion will get the ideas flowing.

In sync with the sad news of Steve Jobs death, let’s begin with a discussion of what is helpful to share publicly and what knowledge requires the utmost security in the enterprise and our personal/professional lives.

PLEASE Register even if you are not certain you can attend so we have an accurate estimate of attendees for handouts. NOTE: The registration page has changed and you will be directed to another site where the registration form resides. It is now hosted by lwmtechnology.com and is legitimate.

Registration Form for Friday

Transitioning to a KM Service Operation

Friday,  September 2, 2011, at 7:30 - 9:30 a.m. Rebecca’s Cafe at Reservoir Place, Trapelo Road, Waltham.

TOPIC:  It is not unusual for departments or business units with responsibility for managing content, business document collaboration, intranets, or technical libraries to be asked to function as an umbrella for organizing, managing and making accessible knowledge assets. You may be in one of these units that has decided to take on greater enterprise responsibility for a wide range of knowledge content management processes and collaborative operations. We will discuss what it means to become a Knowledge-based Service Operation, with a name that includes “knowledge” or in function only. How did you or will you position your role in the process? [For those who wanted to and could not attend, we will re-visit this topic again at a later time.]

For those interested in the topic you might want to check out the discussions on KM Edge, hosted by APQC, on LinkedIn. Here is a recent post and if you join you can view the comments: On LinkedIn:      KM Edge [http://www.linkedin.com/groups?home=&gid=102072&trk=anet_ug_hm]

What is the origin of “knowledge management” expression?
I have done some quick research in Scopus database and I found “knowledge management” in a couple IT articles about document management in late 80′. But when and where was the expression “knowledge management” was used for the first very time as we know today?

Two Books of interest:

Srikantaiah, T. Kanti, ed. Knowledge Management in Practice: Connections and Context, edited by T. Kanti Srikantaiah and Michael E. D. Koenig. Information Today, 03/2008, 519p. 9781573873123

Knowledge Management in Practice: Connections and Context is the third entry in an ambitious, highly regarded KM book series edited by T. Kanti Srikantaiah and Michael E. D. Koenig. Where Knowledge Management for the Information Professional (2000) offered information professionals an introduction to KM and Knowledge Management Lessons Learned (2004) assessed KM applications and innovations, this book looks at how KM can be and is being implemented in organizations today.

The insights of more than 20 experts are featured in 26 chapters, organized in these nine parts:
The Three-Dimensional Expansion of KM
Identifying the Knowledge
KM Strategy
KM Techniques and Technology
Knowledge Sharing
KM Measurement and Assessment
KM and Project Management
Knowledge Preservation
KM in Government

Knowledge Management in Practice is unique in surveying the efforts of KM professionals to extend knowledge beyond their organizations and in providing a framework for understanding user context. The result is a must-read for any professional seeking to connect organizational KM systems with increasingly diverse and geographically dispersed user communities.  This includes chapters by Patti Anklam, Laurence Chait and Lynda Moulton (Knowledge Audits) http://books.infotoday.com/asist/KnowledgeManagementInPractice.shtml

Tiwana, Amrit. Knowledge management toolkit: orchestrating IT, strategy, and knowledge platforms. 2nd ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc., 2002, 383p.

Focus on infrastructure planning; CD-ROM with sample software applications (demo versions).
http://www.amazon.com/Knowledge-Management-Toolkit-Practical-Techniques/dp/0130128538

PLEASE Register even if you are not certain you can attend so we have an accurate estimate of attendees for handouts. NOTE: The registration page has changed and you will be directed to another site where the registration form resides. It is now hosted by lwmtechnology.com and is legitimate.

Registration Form for Friday

Age Divides and KM

Friday, August 5, 2011 at 7:30 - 9:30 a.m. Rebecca’s Cafe at Reservoir Place, Trapelo Road, Waltham.

TOPIC:  At the suggestion of one of the Boston SIKM leaders, Kate Pugh, we are going to toss out the issue of “age divides” in approaches to knowledge leveraging and utilization. This is a topic that surfaces in various forms at many of our meetings and is often in relation to styles of sharing, learning, and collaborating. Another member picked up a quip from our Bentley program on July 20th and shared it with amusement, ” “just because we both have iPhones doesn’t mean my mother-in-law & I have great conversations.” Is this another aspects of an age divide?

This end-of-the-summer topic should be fun to contemplate. It would be great to come to some mutual understandings about how we can all play nice together in the workplace.

Registration Form for Friday Only

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Staging a SharePoint Summit: What do you Need to Know?

Friday, July 1, 2011 at 7:30 - 9:30 a.m. Rebecca’s Cafe at Reservoir Place, Trapelo Road, Waltham.

TOPIC:  We have an upcoming program on July 20th at Bentley University where all presentations will be focused on planning,  selecting, or implementing a collaboration platform, with the focus being on SharePoint. In addition to expert speakers, we will have adopters and 3rd-party integrators on a panel in the afternoon. We want to begin the panel discussion by asking them specific questions from the audience and the entire Boston KM Forum community.

The topic for the July 1 breakfast discussion is: What questions would you want to ask experts about SharePoint, or what advice would you seek from people already in production with SharePoint. The questions you raise on Friday will form the foundation for the moderator to pose to the panel at the July 20th meeting.

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Using Text Analytics to Understand Social Media Content

Friday, June 3, at 7:30 - 9:30 a.m. Rebecca’s Cafe at Reservoir Place, Trapelo Road, Waltham.

TOPIC: A popular theme at the Text Analytics Summit in Boston May 18-19 was text analytics applied to social media commentary both within and outside the enterprise. There was consensus that, when judiciously considered, the content can provide valuable knowledge related to markets, voice of the customer, trends, internal operations and competitors.

What tools are used your organization and what insights have been gained from all the commentary and noise that fills our feeds and “in-boxes” on a daily basis? Are there applications that work or just confuse decision-making? What analytics results are worthy of consideration and what is the context for judging value?

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Knowledge; Prompting Sharing Anyhow or Anywhere

Friday, March 4, 2011 at 7:30 - 9:30 a.m. Rebecca’s Cafe at Reservoir Place, Trapelo Road, Waltham.

TOPIC:  KM facilitators, champions, and followers often lapse into discussion and debates about the need for better collaboration, the need to share what we know, technical tools and the use of incentives. You are probably “in the loop” when it comes to areas where you are an expert or have a key role.

  • What are you observing about how others in that loop share what they know?
  • What gets shared and what has to be drawn out by stealth?
  • Have you seen failures in planning, process and execution of key activities because a sharing mechanism failed to deliver?
  • What are the successes or positive activities that delivered meaningful knowledge in your community of practice?

Bring experiences from both professional and extra-curricular engagements to this story-telling roundtable.

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Meeting Notes and Readings

Comparing Free Information Resources: Internet Search Engines +

Friday, February 4 at 7:30 - 9:30 a.m. Rebecca’s Cafe at Reservoir Place, Trapelo Road, Waltham.

TOPIC:  Our recent programs have been focused narrowly on technologies and practices for specialized applications in enterprises. Significant changes to our favorite Web search engines continue to emerge. Google is being challenged as the search engine of choice when we seek information outside our firewalls.

Tell us what your resource “best bets” are now and how you use each. Does Google continue to meet your needs? Where do you begin a search for new information? What kinds of information do you seek in the course of your working day? Where are the gaps in your resource library of searchable content?

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Good discussion that focused on the merits and differentiators among free search engines, where to find obscure content and burrowing into web sites that are revealed by meta-search engines like http://www.usa.gov/. For example, if you use this site to find government agencies involved in energy, you will be using BING. If you then reach the Pacific Northwest Laboratory through the Bing results, then use the PNL search engine, you will be using the Google mini (a site search engine). It was noted that many people do not understand that different search engines will deliver different results on the same content.

The following search engine lists and articles were shared:

Segal, David. The Dirty Little Secrets of Search. NY Times, 2/12/2011

How a campaign of paid links on all kinds of unrelated Web sites pushed one retailer to the top of Google results.

Dogpile. http://www.dogpile.com/
Google Says Bing `Copying’ Search Results; Microsoft Cites Customer Data, By Brian Womack and Dina Bass.

Google is trying to preserve its lead in search as Bing increases market share. Bing had 12 percent of U.S. searches in December, up from 11.8 percent the previous month, according to ComScore Inc. in Reston, Virginia. Google had 66.6 percent, up from 66.2 percent. http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-02-01/google-says-bing-copying-search-results-microsoft-cites-customer-data.html

Phil Bradley’s website. Web search engines.

I’ve put together a list of 150+ general web search engines; that is to say, search engines that search the web. It is not a complete listing, nor is it a ‘best of’; it’s just a collection of engines that I know about and that I’ve blogged about as well. There’s a few specialist ones too! http://www.philb.com/webse.htm

Search Engine List: 20SEARCH ALL THE WEB ALTA VISTA AOL SEARCH ASK JEEVES DOGPILE EBAY EXCITE GIGABLAST GOOGLE IWON JOEANT LYCOS MAMMA MSN NETSCAPE OPEN DIRECTORY WEBCRAWLER

WIKIPEDIA YAHOO, http://www.20search.com/

The Search Engine List: Comprehensive list of Search Engines. http://www.thesearchenginelist.com/

WikiPedia. List of search engines. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_search_engines